Stompy Uncle Joe! Superheavy Soviet Mecha

Dan here – I wasn’t going to do a post on this (going to wait to the Grand Unveiling of my new look Holy Soviet Army) but Jim saw it and I thought he was going to shit out a lung – he convinced me it deserved a blog post in it’s own right.

So I began with a Steam Mech papercraft template that I downloaded from http://www.toposolitario.com a couple of years ago (although sadly it doesn’t seem to be there anymore). I built up the main sections of the hull and legs and wound up with this:

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As you can see, I’ve added a few bits – rivets are cardboard using a 1/8″ hole puncher like this which as an essential in doing this kind of stuff. I cut out a couple of bits of cereal box card for extra plating, around the feet, built a Lightning Launcher from card, greenstuff and cocktail stick and one of those ring pull inserts you get in milk cartons and sauce bottles became the anti aircraft radar dish and gun mount.

In these you can see the powerfist/flamethrower arm built from drinking straws, a piece of scrap foamboard for the fist with the fingers built from cocktail sticks chopped down to 1cm ish lengths, snapped in half and the break sealed with superglue. I’ve also added more armour plate, hatches, and HUNDREDS OF BLOODY RIVETS.

Primed with £1 black spray paint and based with Vallejo Russian Green.

Washed with Army Painter Green Tone.

From there, I drybrushed with Russian Green which I lightened with tan craft paint, then a pin wash of Vallejo Brown ink around the hatches and the HUNDREDS OF BLOODY RIVETS, before weathering . This was sponge chipping, first black and then Vallejo German Grey, and I went HEAVY on this, I like a grungy look for my forces. Then I gave the legs, arms etc a drybrush of Burnt Umber dark brown, which I highlighted with a final drybrush of a mid brown tone.

 

Stompy Uncle Joe leading the Holy Soviet Army to inevitable victory! Za Rodina!

Side note – the template was designed with 28mm in mind, I believe – in 1/72 it’s MASSIVE, we’re talking Imperial Knight size. Jim lad, prepare to be crushed beneath Emperor Stalin’s iron fist!

 

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Terrain Talk Pt. 3 – The Board

Let me start by linking the videos that were largely the blueprints for this project (both by Mel The Terrain Tutor):

In Depth Guide To Realistic Flocking (47 minutes, but it’s a better way of spending 47 minutes than watching the Kardashians…)

Texturing Gaming Boards With Filler (20 minutes)

So, as the new generation terrain began to develop, we decided that the board was starting to look a little tired and tatty… Time for a change.

Our board is a pair of 12mm thick 3’x 4′ chipboard shelves bought from B & Q a couple of years ago – unfortunately, logistical challenges (to be specific, my car) meant we couldn’t keep a 6’x4′ slab together, but they fit together quite nicely and provide a good solid base for gaming on.

Step 1 – Texture

We first tried painting texture paste over the original coating of artificial grass and grit, but it soon became clear that wasn’t going to work, so we simply flipped the board and started again. Using the texture paste idea from the Terrain Tutor video , we knocked up a paste from filler powder, play sand, PVA glue and water. The ratios will vary depending on how you want to texture it, so experiment! You’ll need about 2 litres to cover the board, and you’ll want to leave about 24 hours to dry. Be sure to stipple rather than brush as you don’t want unnatural looking straight lines.

Step 2 – Painting

With the paste dried nicely, next step was spray painting a black basecoat. A word of warning here, you’re going to need a LOT of spray paint. Seriously, we went through five of the £1 cans from our nearest pound shop. This project EATS supplies.

Next up was a drybrush, following the pallette of earth tones I copied from 3T Studios.

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Starting to take shape…

 

Some close ups of the textures this method accomplishes.

I also wanted to replicate some of the cool exposed rock effects that you see on GW Realm Of Battle boards, so I used a dab of filler and traced cracks into it with a very fine bit of wire.

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Rocky surfaces in white

With the earth tones applied, I painted the rocks in the same way I painted the rocky parts on the hills we did recently.

Step 3 – Flocking

The Terrain Tutor’s video is a must see for this step. Basically, he’s using a three tone approach which I nicked, shamelessly. A good time saver here is to use a small sieve to evenly distribute the flock all over the board creating areas of dark and lighter grass, in some places allowing the original texture paste to show through and blending in some fine dust gathered from my garage floor!

I took Mel’s tip about using a window cleaning sprayer with diluted PVA to blend and seal the flock, and then a couple of coats of matt varnish to seal the whole thing.

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Seen drying here, but you get an idea…

Close ups of the details

 

In situ with the new look Buffalo 2-7 deploying across it!

Now just waiting for Dan to finish mucking around with his Holy Soviets and we’re going to christen this bad boy with a truly APOCALYPTIC battle! Stay tuned 😉

Terrain Talk! Pt. 2 – Hills

Once again, shouts out to Lukes APS, Mel The Terrain Tutor and 3T STudios here – they are responsible for teaching Dan & I what we used to make this stuff. Credit where it’s due!

So last time out it was ruins, now I’d like to share with you How I Build Hills…

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This was where I started – Good quality thin corrugated card, two layers glued together at 180 degree angles so the corrugation folds cross each other, helping prevent warping. On top of that – blue modelling foam (although for subsequent builds I’ll be using Celotex insulation foam, as that’s what my local Wickes have in store for FAR less money). I’ve carved two layers with a cheap DIY knife, glues them together using tacky glue and then textured using filler (spackle, for my American friends). Embedded in the filler are bits of masonry offcuts, mortar, a stick my dog chewed up, stones from the back of the garden and bits of gravel – basically anything with an interesting looking texture that happened to be lying around. Skinflint don’t pay for texture, yo. I then sanded down any rough edges, covered the thing with PVA, sprinkled it with sand and cat litter, before undercoating black with cheap £1 spray paint.

NB – make sure you’ve covered up the foam in texture or grit or something before you spray, because the chemicals in the spray paint will melt your foam..

Next stage is painting:

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Drybrushed up with the earth tone palette I mentioned in the last terrain post.

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After drybrushing a basic blue grey onto the rocky areas, I followed Luke’s APS advice and dabbed in a little red on the rocky areas…

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The next step was drybrushing successively lighter greys onto the rocky areas – again using the same palette of paints discussed last time. This helps homogenise your terrain and pull it all together, kind of the way comic book artists try to unify and limit their palette.

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Then flocking! Jarvis JFT01 is my main colour here, with JFT02 and 03 providing shade.

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Wet blended a little dust from my garage floor, spray sealed with diluted PVA, sprayed with matt varnish and it’s good to go! Nice and dramatic, and the Orks of Da Skooderia certainly seem to agree with me..

 

I’m genuinely pleased with this hill, particularly the rocky bits, and it’s not actually that hard to do.. so the old hills will be upcycled to match! Stay tuned for our final terrain post – the board itself…(dun dun DUN!) 😉