Armies (FINALLY) On Parade: Da Skooderia Ferrorki!

Drumroll please… yes, in a mere three years from initial concept to final completion! Oh yes – we get it DONE.

So, the concept for this (and indeed our entire “Cheaphammer” project) was to see if we could create the same sort of visual spectacle and entertainment of a full blown 40k game without taking out the second mortgage needed to do it with GW products. Again, this is not an anti-GW rant – if they were too expensive, they’d go bust. They’re just too expensive for us.

So what we’re doing here is using the (by comparison) ludicrously cheap 1/72 scale – plastic army guys, basically, along with scratchbuilt and converted vehicles from papercraft templates and household junk. Those of you of a certain age will remember the very first “Rogue Trader” edition of Warhammer 40,000 and it’s instruction on how to build a Space Marine Grav Attack tank from deodorant bottles and plastic spoons – that’s the legacy we’re continuing!

So having accidentally acquired a copy of the 40k 2nd edbox set on Ebay, we’ve now built a 2nd ed legal Imperial Guard force using Airfix “Modern US” troops converted with green stuff and papercraft armour, the Orks were well overdue a shot at fame and glory!

I always had a thing for the Evil Sunz clan and their obsession with all things red and fast – and what else is red and fast?

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Oh yes.

And thus was born the concept – Da Skooderia Ferrorki, a Ferrari F1- themed Evil Sunz warband!

The ladz on parade!

First, the list:

Warboss Enzo Ferrorki – ‘ Eavy Armour, Bolt Pistol, Kustom Shoota (82 pts)

Bigboss Dino Ferrorki – ‘Eavy Armour, Bolt Pistol, Chainsword, Frag Stikkbomb (46 pts)

Nobz Mob (“Da Management”) – 3  Nobz, w/ ‘Eavy Armour, Frag Stikkbomz, Boltpistol, Chainsword (78 pts)

Da Furst Mob – 5 Evil Sunz Boyz w/ Flak Armour, Boltgun, Axe, Frag Stikkbomz (15 pts each)

1 Evil Sunz Boy w/ Flak Armour, Bolt Pistol, Heavy Plasma Gun, knife (26 pts)

Da Secund Mob – 5 Evil Sunz Boyz w/ Flak Armour, Boltgun, Axe, Frag Stikkbomz (15 pts each)

1 Evil Sunz Boy w/ Flak Armour, Bolt Pistol, Heavy Bolter, knife (10 pts)

Da ‘Ard Boyz – 5 Goff Skarboyz w/ Flak Armour, Boltgun, Axe, Frag Stikkbomz (15 pts each)

1 Goff Skarboy w/ Flak Armour, Bolt Pistol, Multi-Melta (39 pts)

Mek Mikael Schumorker – Flak Armour, Bolt Pistol, Kustom Blasta, Kustom Force Field – (68 pts)

Painboy Dok Nikky Louda – Flak Armour, Bolt Pistol, Lascannon, Kustom Force Field, Doc’s Tools (76 pts)

Killa Kan – 2x Power Klaw, Heavy Flamer, Heavy Bolter (120 pts)

Battle Wagon (50 pts)

Warbuggy Red 5 – twin linked Autocannon (60 pts)

Warbuggy  Red 7 – Multi Melta (65 pts)

Now… pics!

Warboss Enzo Ferrorki!
And sidekick, Dino Ferrorki!
Nobz Mob, “Da Management”
Mek Mikael Schumorker
Dok Nikky Louda
Da Furst Mob
Da Secund Mob
Da ‘Ard Boyz
Da Wagon – note Flag Wava with Prancing Ork banner.. he has no effect in game, but I loved the model!
Da Kan – details on the build can be found here
Warbuggy Red 5, driven by Sebastian Metal – details on the build can be found here
Warbuggy Red 7, driven by Kimi Rorkonnen and Felipe Masha – details on the build can be found here
Enzo leads the Boyz into battle!
The Red Horde

So there we go – been a fun project, despite a few setbacks, and now they’re ready to roll I’m pretty proud of them. The infantry are Caesar Miniatures Fantasy Orcs, which are great little miniatures, well made and a joy to paint. They do a number of fantasy lines which we’ll definitely be investigating for our “Hyperian Wars” games. Weapons are from Sgts Mess, any other conversions/ butchery are down to greenstuff.

We’ve also learned alot about painting figures this small – namely, prime white and wash down rather than highlight up, as thinner washes don’t cover up detail. If anyone’s interested in how we did the boyz, let us know in the comments.

Now, we have the armies, we have the board, we have the terrain.. now all we need to do is (ahem) learn how to play the game…. See you soon with a battle report!

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Cheaphammer 40k: Da Skooderia Pt. 4 – Scratchbuilt Killa Kan!

So it’s been half term this week in Ye Olde England, and that’s a chance to put the feet up, raid the junk bin and MAKE STUFF.

After a mere three year gestation period, Da Skooderia Ferrorki are finally starting to approach the tabletop – DIY battlewagon and warbuggies in the last instalment, and before we tackle the fiddly infantry conversions (using Caesar 1/72 fantasy orcs as our base models) it’s time to bring some firepower to the table in the form of an Orky Dreadnought!

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We begin with three bottle caps glued together to create the body. Next stop was puncturing these caps to allow insert point for the arms and legs (kebab skewers) – this was done with a screw driver and a pocket knife, although in retrospect a pin vise would be a better bet. (Health & Safety warning – if you’re doing this, be careful I managed to slash my index finger open. Not recommended, I like my index finger unslashed. )

For the hip joints, I used little pieces of scrap foamboard – as you’ll see later, this created a few problems.. if I was doing it again, I’d use greenstuff – and buried the legs and hips in it, cementing with tacky PVA based glue. You don’t want superglue or anything solvent based for foamboard, as it melts the foam. Feet were octagons cut from foamboard, and the knee joints were done by cracking the legs and soaking the cracked joint in superglue.[Thumb - 20180213_100457.jpg]

Shown here with Warboss Enzo Ferrorki for scale – base is cardstock, drew around the bottom of a wine glass and cut out

Next up, weapons! This Dread is packing a heavy bolter and a heavy flamer, along with a couple of Power Klaws – I figured it made most sense to mount the ranged weapons on the shoulders and leave the lower arms free for close combat. Obviously you shouldn’t apply too much sense and logic though – it is an Ork vehicle, after all.[Thumb - 20180213_111209.jpg]

Coming together now!

Arms are cocktail sticks using the snap & superglue technique, then little offcuts of guitar string (low E, if you’re interested) bent into a V shape and embedded in greenstuff for the wrists. I used greenstuff to attach and reinforce the joints onto the shoulders.

I chopped up cocktail sticks and a little bit of drinking straw to created the weapons, superglueing the parts together before attaching them to the shoulders using greenstuff – by this point I was feeling pretty good about the project![Thumb - 20180213_195646.jpg]

Detailing and rivets – SO MANY RIVETS – added

With the basic elements done, time for detailng! I used Google Images to get some inspiration here using a defunct watch batter for the top hatch scrap card for the teef and other bitz, card and foamboard for the engine block at the back, straw and cocktail sticks for the exhaust stacks, and because this is 40k and these are Orks – RIVETS!!! MANY MANY RIVETS!!!!

Actually, this is where being super cheapy 1/72 scale pays off, as instead of arsing around with holepunching and glueing fiddly bits of card until you’re driven to the bottle in frustration, I just use the tip of a cocktail stick to dab on little dollops of PVA. This dries nicely into a dome (ish) shape which pin washing and drybrushing picks up nicely.

Next up was priming – I used cheap white car spray paint as I wanted the red nice and vivid, and in any case I didn’t have any black – and this was where things went a bit awry. Although I covered the exposed areas of foam with PVA and paint, I clearly didn’t do it thoroughly enough as something in the spray paint reacted with the foam, causing a slight change in the gait – in short, it looks pissed as a rat.

Paint scheme is exactly the same as I used on the buggies and battlewagon, so I won’t go into that here.

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Whatchoo lookin’ at? Hic!

I went heavy with the weathering again, based with a mix of Garage Floor Dust (patent pending) and flock, finishing with a coat of matt varnish, and good to go!

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Skooderia Dreadnought
Charging the puny humies of the Hazzard 1977th Imperial Guard..

It’s a shame about the wonky gait, but the more I look at it, the more I quite like it – I imagine this guy lurching across the battlefield, piloted by a Grot drunk on both power and fungus wine! He’s certainly a big fella, probably close to his 28mm counterpart, and should provide both a visual centrepiece and some hefty punch when Da Skooderia FINALLY hit the tabletop…

Overall a fun build, and actually not too tricky. I’d like to give a shout out to Wyloch of Wyloch’s Crafting Videos whose superb series on DIY miniatures inspired this build – thanks man, we’re waiting to see what you come up with next!

Stay thrifty out there, we’ll be back next time with some teeny weeny greeny meanies as the Boyz get their turn in the spotlight.

Terrain Talk Pt. 4a – Plasma Reactor (1 of 2)

 

January is Austerity Month here at Skinflint HQ, we’ve blown all our cash on gin, biscuits and Last Jedi tickets – so that means a hobby budget of £0 for the first month of 2018. But does that mean that we have to stop making stuff? Of course not – thriftiness is the mother of invention.

And in that vein, I grabbed the glue gun and ventured into the box of Interestingly Shaped Crap that all we gamers keep hidden away in the depths of a cupboard..

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A defunct lightbulb, a CD for a printer that’s long since gone for recycling, the lid from a box of Q tips, some straws and a few bit of card…

I knew when that bulb went that it was Too Interestingly Shaped to throw away (and as luck would have it, I had another one.. stay tuned) – it put me in mind of the Imperial Plasma Reactors from Dawn Of War, screaming to be turned into something sci-fi-esque… and pawing through my box I discovered the Q-tip box lid which could serve as a base/fuel tank/ reactor core, which set the basic shape in my mind. I used a mix of hot glue, tacky glue and polystyrene cement to attach these together (with mixed results, as you’ll see later on..), and then cut some drinking straws to size to function as power conduits/ coolant pipes. A good tip here – drinking straws have very little surface area for contact and glueing, so filling them with something solid is a good idea. I glued a bit of kebab skewer inside each one, meaning I had a decent contact area with the bulb and the lid. I then added a few bits of cardboard detailing to be a control panel of some kind, and trimmed a sheet of granny grating to create access ladders.

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Primed it grey, left it overnight in the shed while I wondered how the hell to paint it next.
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Roughed out a basic colour scheme… and then things started to go awry!

I wanted something that could serve as both an Imperial piece for 40k or Epic and a suitable clunky retro-sci fi piece that could conceivably be a part of a 1950’s superscience project, so I picked Vallejo Olive Drab for the base and body, a generic Boltgun Metal equivalent over  a black undercoat for the base of the bulb and the tubular part got painted blue in preparation for a cool forcefield trick I saw on a Warhammer TV post.

Unfortunately, I encountered a few problems during this phase – for a start, thinnning down my black paint meant that it refused to adhere to the primer.. and then, the water in the acrylic paints began to reactivate the tacky glue (which is just regular PVA with isopropyl alcohol added for faster drying) – meaning the model literally came apart on me!

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That went well.

So after much swearing, and a few consultations on Facebook, I (sorry Dan) slightly reneged on the “no money” pledge of January and bought some superglue and No More Nails, which seems to have done the trick.

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Inelegant, but stable
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Now we’re getting somewhere… (by the way, rivets are dots of PVA added with a cocktail stick)

After the initial colouring, I washed the olive drab with Army Painter Green Tone, pin washed the detail parts (rivets, ladders etc) with a homebrew wash of green and black paint thinned with water and detergent, then drybrushed up with Vallejo Olive Drab, lightened with cheap tan craft paint for highlighting. I added a few streaks and pin washed Vallejo Smokey Ink, and sponge chipped with grey, black and metallic for a weathered appearance.

Following Duncan Rhodes (hallowed be his name)’s advice, I created the forcefield effect by stippling on purple and light blue patches, before outlining the lightning patterns faintly in grey and going over them with white.

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I camouflaged the No More Nails residue around the base by painting it up as mud, highlighting up from dark brown to light brown – and here it is in situ:

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A fair few flaws in the detail, but not too shabby from two feet away.

Guarded by Squad Beauregard from the Hazzard 1977th:

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And there you go, a cheap and (relatively) simple scratchbuild! And now I know a little more about glues and paint… the next model should go alot more smoothly.

Hmm, famous last words. Never mind – till next time, stay thrifty and happy gaming to you all!

Cheap ‘n’ Simple Scratchbuild – Holy Soviet Empire Shock Drones DIY Miniatures

How do – Dan here again. After Jim’s revamp of his decadent Western capitalist imperialist helots (which included a reinforcement with a dastardly M42 Stealth Tank and a close air support flight of Avrocar flying saucer tankbusters), I’ve had to up the game for my Holy Soviet Army in the hope of Lt. Polikarpov finally getting a victory for the workers.

This started with the BEHEMOTH mech I showed you last time, but seeing as we got such a positive response I thought I’d share these little critters with you – a pair of Shock Drones. Now, these are inspired by and similar to (but definitely not the same as) the notorious Terror Drones from Red Alert 2, and function in a similar way – basically fast moving close combat killers with limited AI and rigged to self-destruct when they hit Allied lines!

So – the build. For materials, you’ll need a few wee tiny offcuts of foamboard, some cocktail sticks, some glue that isn’t superglue, some glue that is superglue, some bits of sprue, some wee little bits of cardboard, and some disused guitar strings or bits of wire.

Step 1:

Foamboard. Take a rectangle of foamboard, 20mm x 15mm, and trim it at the edges. Count 5mm in each side and trim off. This gives you an octagonal shape which is the main body of the droid.

Step 2:

Glue a bit of sprue on top. Two if you’re really enthusiastic. These are the sensor superstructures on top of the droid.

Step 3:

Legs. You’ll need two cocktail sticks. Chop them in half, and then score each half a stick in the middle. Break the stick along that line but leave it in one piece and bend it at an angle. You then soak it with superglue to stiffen that joint. It will harden and actually be more solid than you might expect. Then you cut a V-shaped piece of cardboard, score it along the middle and fold it, and glue those to the “shins” of the legs (it doesn’t matter which way round you do it, but I had the sharp bits of the cocktail sticks as the feet). The other end of the cocktail stick gets dunked in glue (NOT SUPERGLUE – that will melt the foam) and pushed into the foam on the edges.

Tell you what, here’s a picture:

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Step 4: Attack cables

Guitar strings (or wire) wound up around a screwdriver, dunked in glue and pushed into the foam.

Step 5: Painting

This is exactly the same as the paint scheme for Stompy Uncle Joe, with one MAJOR difference – DON’T USE SPRAY PAINT! Spray paint has a chemical in it that melts foam. Your model is largely made from foam.

Some close ups of the finished articles:

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This is a dead easy build, and the little fellas actually do look quite nice in situ:

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Seen here about to rip apart an M60A3 Centurion..

They’ll certainly be a valuable addition to the rolling firestorm that is the Holy Soviet Army, skittering ahead to attack whatever enemy unit registers on their crude but effective sensor arrays. They also represent a potent, if somewhat unconventional anti-tank capability – admittedly the Holy Soviet Army likes to deal with tanks by using LOTS MORE TANKS (and occasionally the Holy Mystic to chuck them about).

We’re going with Armour Rating 12, Speed 24cm, CCR8 but no ranged weapons. A rugged Soviet construction method means the first hit penetrating the armour won’t destroy them, just halve their stats – the second takes them down, and when they go, they explode like a frag grenade!

And of course, there’s no way they could get hacked and go haywire. Is there, Jim?

Terrain Talk Pt. 3 – The Board

Let me start by linking the videos that were largely the blueprints for this project (both by Mel The Terrain Tutor):

In Depth Guide To Realistic Flocking (47 minutes, but it’s a better way of spending 47 minutes than watching the Kardashians…)

Texturing Gaming Boards With Filler (20 minutes)

So, as the new generation terrain began to develop, we decided that the board was starting to look a little tired and tatty… Time for a change.

Our board is a pair of 12mm thick 3’x 4′ chipboard shelves bought from B & Q a couple of years ago – unfortunately, logistical challenges (to be specific, my car) meant we couldn’t keep a 6’x4′ slab together, but they fit together quite nicely and provide a good solid base for gaming on.

Step 1 – Texture

We first tried painting texture paste over the original coating of artificial grass and grit, but it soon became clear that wasn’t going to work, so we simply flipped the board and started again. Using the texture paste idea from the Terrain Tutor video , we knocked up a paste from filler powder, play sand, PVA glue and water. The ratios will vary depending on how you want to texture it, so experiment! You’ll need about 2 litres to cover the board, and you’ll want to leave about 24 hours to dry. Be sure to stipple rather than brush as you don’t want unnatural looking straight lines.

Step 2 – Painting

With the paste dried nicely, next step was spray painting a black basecoat. A word of warning here, you’re going to need a LOT of spray paint. Seriously, we went through five of the £1 cans from our nearest pound shop. This project EATS supplies.

Next up was a drybrush, following the pallette of earth tones I copied from 3T Studios.

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Starting to take shape…

 

Some close ups of the textures this method accomplishes.

I also wanted to replicate some of the cool exposed rock effects that you see on GW Realm Of Battle boards, so I used a dab of filler and traced cracks into it with a very fine bit of wire.

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Rocky surfaces in white

With the earth tones applied, I painted the rocks in the same way I painted the rocky parts on the hills we did recently.

Step 3 – Flocking

The Terrain Tutor’s video is a must see for this step. Basically, he’s using a three tone approach which I nicked, shamelessly. A good time saver here is to use a small sieve to evenly distribute the flock all over the board creating areas of dark and lighter grass, in some places allowing the original texture paste to show through and blending in some fine dust gathered from my garage floor!

I took Mel’s tip about using a window cleaning sprayer with diluted PVA to blend and seal the flock, and then a couple of coats of matt varnish to seal the whole thing.

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Seen drying here, but you get an idea…

Close ups of the details

 

In situ with the new look Buffalo 2-7 deploying across it!

Now just waiting for Dan to finish mucking around with his Holy Soviets and we’re going to christen this bad boy with a truly APOCALYPTIC battle! Stay tuned 😉

Terrain Talk! Pt. 2 – Hills

Once again, shouts out to Lukes APS, Mel The Terrain Tutor and 3T STudios here – they are responsible for teaching Dan & I what we used to make this stuff. Credit where it’s due!

So last time out it was ruins, now I’d like to share with you How I Build Hills…

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This was where I started – Good quality thin corrugated card, two layers glued together at 180 degree angles so the corrugation folds cross each other, helping prevent warping. On top of that – blue modelling foam (although for subsequent builds I’ll be using Celotex insulation foam, as that’s what my local Wickes have in store for FAR less money). I’ve carved two layers with a cheap DIY knife, glues them together using tacky glue and then textured using filler (spackle, for my American friends). Embedded in the filler are bits of masonry offcuts, mortar, a stick my dog chewed up, stones from the back of the garden and bits of gravel – basically anything with an interesting looking texture that happened to be lying around. Skinflint don’t pay for texture, yo. I then sanded down any rough edges, covered the thing with PVA, sprinkled it with sand and cat litter, before undercoating black with cheap £1 spray paint.

NB – make sure you’ve covered up the foam in texture or grit or something before you spray, because the chemicals in the spray paint will melt your foam..

Next stage is painting:

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Drybrushed up with the earth tone palette I mentioned in the last terrain post.

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After drybrushing a basic blue grey onto the rocky areas, I followed Luke’s APS advice and dabbed in a little red on the rocky areas…

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The next step was drybrushing successively lighter greys onto the rocky areas – again using the same palette of paints discussed last time. This helps homogenise your terrain and pull it all together, kind of the way comic book artists try to unify and limit their palette.

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Then flocking! Jarvis JFT01 is my main colour here, with JFT02 and 03 providing shade.

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Wet blended a little dust from my garage floor, spray sealed with diluted PVA, sprayed with matt varnish and it’s good to go! Nice and dramatic, and the Orks of Da Skooderia certainly seem to agree with me..

 

I’m genuinely pleased with this hill, particularly the rocky bits, and it’s not actually that hard to do.. so the old hills will be upcycled to match! Stay tuned for our final terrain post – the board itself…(dun dun DUN!) 😉